How to Set Up a Facebook Page Profanity Filter

Unfortunately Facebook page admins all share a common problem – we have to sleep.

And that means there’s always going to be a window of opportunity for “trolls” and “spammers” to run amok on your Facebook page.

Luckily Facebook allows community managers the ability to set up a profanity filter that will automatically screen posts by others on your page.

This week’s Social Media Minute will teach you how to set up page moderation and how to find spam in your activity log.

SEE ALSO: Facebook Activity Log Overview

Facebook-page-profanity-filter-set-up

Watch the helpful social media tutorial video below for a full walk-through:

Video Tutorial:

How to Set Up a Facebook Page Profanity Filter – Social Media Minute



Learn the basics of setting up a profanity filter for your Facebook page in this social media tutorial.

Remember: There are two separate tools to help you filter profanity from your Fanpage.

Profanity Filter

Using the profanity filter you can choose whether to block profanity from your Page, and to what degree. Facebook determines what to block by using the most commonly reported words and phrases marked offensive by the community. This also includes types of posts that you have hidden as a page admin.

In any case, I suggest setting this to strong simply for the assurance that your page has something better than stock protection.

Page Moderation

Now page moderation allows you to add keywords you’d like to block from appearing on your page. If one of these keywords is used in a post or comment, it will be automatically marked as spam.

For example I kept it pretty PG with the word in this video, but let me assure you, you’d be surprised how many profanity word lists are available with a simple Google search.

I’ll leave that up to you.

Takeaways

It’s a good idea to always keep your page moderation setting up to date with new keywords or slang you discover and make sure to include misspellings or words using numbers (ie: 5tupid) when filling out the list. Though this can be very time consuming, remember that trolls are clever and will find ways to harass your page so it will all pay off in the long run.

Also keep in mind that profanity keywords in images cannot be screened by your page moderation filter, so depending on your audience it’s recommended to check your page daily.

What’s your experience with Facebook’s Profanity filter?

Author: Jacob Curtis

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